Beverly Hills Therapy Group
(248) 480-0115

BH Therapy Group Blog

01
Oct

Feeling down? It may be lifestyle fatigue.

As a result of the pandemic, many people have developed sedentary lifestyles characterized by isolation, inactivity, and mindless scrolling through screens. It is common nowadays for people to complain about chronic fatigue, feeling as though they have barely enough energy to get through their day.  Why has fatigue become such a widespread problem? Pandemic Effects and Fatigue We spend way too much time at home on our phones, binge-watching TV, and mindlessly watching TikTok videos or YouTube videos. We’ve all been there.  Several factors contributed to the development...
Read More
12
Sep

What You Need to Know About Substance Abuse & Mental Health

National Recovery Month One in twelve adults living in the United States suffer from a substance use disorder (SUD). Each September we recognize National Recovery Month. Uncontrolled substance use is a mental health disorder. Substance use begins with a voluntary decision. Due to changes in brain function, it becomes a compulsive pattern over time. Moderate to severe symptoms can occur, with addiction being the most severe.  Though the exact causes of SUD are unknown, it is characterized by distorted thinking and behavior patterns. Symptoms of SUD include personality...
Read More
06
Sep

Actionable Ways to Cope with Suicidal Thoughts

National Suicide Prevention Week (9/4-10), World Suicide Prevention Day Sept 10 From September 4th through the 10th, people around the globe recognize National Suicide Prevention Week, ending with World Suicide Prevention Day on September 10th.  Even though suicidal thoughts are frightening, they are not uncommon. A large number of people have experienced suicidal thoughts at some point in their lives. Know that you are not alone, and that these feelings and thoughts can be overcome.   Please seek help immediately if you’re considering suicide. Dial 988 to reach the...
Read More
09
Aug

Big Changes? Here’s How to Cope with Transitions

Throughout life, there is always going to be change. New relationships, college graduations, and moving are all common life transitions. Even positive changes can be difficult to navigate and cope with. Stress can cause problems if it’s not addressed, whether it’s the result of a thrilling event or an unfortunate accident. Life’s peaks and valleys can never be avoided, so learning to cope with them is a skill you should learn early in your life.   What is a Life Transition?   A life transition is essentially a change in...
Read More
School Stress
02
Aug

Starting the School Year Off Mentally Strong

We are just a few weeks away from the start of a new school year. Many people experience stress and anxiety when they return to school. It is not uncommon for feelings of overwhelm to be exacerbated by a busy schedule and after-school activities. Before the school year begins, it’s important to check in with your mental health. Mental health issues can make academics extremely challenging if they aren’t addressed. It’s beneficial to check on your mental health whether you’re in high school, college, or have children in...
Read More
Reasons You Struggle with Self-Care
14
Jul

Reasons You Struggle with Self-Care

International Self-Care Day is on July 24. Some people view self-care as a form of pampering themselves. If you’ve been wanting to start a self-care practice, you may default to the belief that self-care is something that can only happen once you’ve checked everything else off of your to-do list or when you can afford something expensive. And with that mindset, many put self-care on their ‘eventually’ list.  It can feel impossible to consistently practice self-care. Here are a few reasons why. 1. You’ve Got The Wrong Definition...
Read More
Minority Mental Health Month
07
Jul

Recognizing Minority Mental Health Month and Ways to Improve Care

This July is Minority Mental Health Month and there may be some of you who are wondering: Doesn’t the distinction of minority mental health further divide and isolate minority communities? Is “diversity” no more than a buzzword since the term has become so overused? Wouldn’t a whole month devoted to minority mental health divert attention from the nationwide mental health crisis? Taking these questions into consideration, it’s important to keep in mind that mental illness doesn’t discriminate. Mental illness affects 1 in 5 adults regardless of their race,...
Read More
Trauma
14
Jun

Finding Healing from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

Psychological trauma is a reaction to a challenging or disturbing event. Usually, trauma occurs suddenly and unexpectedly. Trauma takes many forms, but if it interferes with a person’s day-to-day life, it can lead to mental health conditions. On June 27, 2022, we recognize Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Awareness Day.   Symptoms of PTSD  After a traumatic event, such as a car accident or the loss of a loved one, a person may experience extreme anxiety and stress, leading to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Anyone who has been through a traumatic...
Read More
Pride month
07
Jun

Things to Know About LGBTQIA+ Mental Health Challenges & Barriers

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, and asexual (LGBTQIA+) members don’t necessarily face a higher risk of mental health problems. LGBTQIA+ individuals can, however, suffer from mental health issues due to stigma and discrimination from family, friends, and society.   Being LGBTQIA+ is not a mental illness or disorder. Further, it is vital to be aware of common mental health issues that LGBTQIA+ people may face so you can spot any struggles in yourself or a loved one.  LQBTQIA+ Mental Health Facts  In psychology, mental health refers to psychological...
Read More
Anxiety
16
May

Anxiety and Negative Thought Patterns

Clinically, negative thinking patterns are known as cognitive distortions. Negative thought patterns are an extreme and inaccurate way of thinking, such as:  He’s late coming home from work, he must’ve been in an accident. I failed that exam. I should just drop out of school I’m bad at interviews, so what’s the point in applying for the job Occasionally, we all think negatively and jump to conclusions. However, if we continuously think this way, it can lead to increased stress and anxiety, and worsen depression symptoms Cognitive Distortions...
Read More
Smiling women wearing pink for breast cancer
01
May

Women’s Health Month: Empowering Women

May is Women’s Health Month and Mental Health Awareness Month. In this post, we will discuss women’s mental health and how we can support each other instead of comparing ourselves to others.    Everyone has faced many challenges over the last two years. However, for women, there are unique challenges that have exacerbated mental health issues, including navigating COVID, working from home, and certain expectations. Additionally, women experience anxiety and depression at higher rates than men. It is essential to talk openly about Women’s Mental Health and how women...
Read More
doomscrolling
11
Apr

What is “Doomscrolling” and what can you do about it?

What is Doomscrolling? Doom-scrolling is an excessive amount of screen time dedicated to absorbing negative news. We’ve all been victims of it more than once just in the past two years. In addition to content, opinions and emotions also flood our shared internet community. With the number of high-profile events that have occurred since the start of 2020, it can be difficult to look away.  Why do we do it?? The main reason people doom scroll is to feel in control in a world that feels so out...
Read More
Alzheimer's
01
Apr

How to Lower Your Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease

New research suggests that any amount of physical activity can protect your brain Moderate physical activity has been linked to better brain health in numerous studies. Research suggests that people who achieve at least moderate levels of fitness have a lower risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease later in life than those who do not get much movement in their day.  A total of 649,605 U.S. veterans, average age 61, were followed for nine years in this study. The researchers accounted for other risk factors for Alzheimer’s, the most...
Read More
bipolar-disorder
30
Mar

Manic vs Depressive: What’s the difference in Bipolar Disorder?

March 30 – World Bipolar Day World Bipolar Day is on March 30th. Psychological conditions such as bipolar disorder severely affect mood, thoughts, and behaviors. Bipolar disorder is different for each person, but there will always be emotional shifts involved. An emotional shift is characterized by periods of mania and/or depression. While some may experience mostly depressive states, others may experience mostly manic states. Bipolar disorder has several types, but in this article, we will focus on the symptoms of manic and depressive episodes.  Early treatment is critical...
Read More
insomnia and sleep disorders
18
Mar

Treating Insomnia with Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

March 18: World Sleep Day Sleeping disorders, such as insomnia, can be challenging. When you can’t sleep well at night, it can make the rest of the day difficult. This cycle can negatively affect your relationships, mental health, and physical health.   Good news: insomnia does not have to be a permanent problem. Sleeping well and improving your well-being is possible with cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I). March 18th is World Sleep Day, so we want to recognize the role that therapy can play for individuals who suffer...
Read More
self-harm-and-suicide-wide
01
Mar

5 Things You Need To Know About Those Who Self-Harm

Self-Harm Awareness Month. Despite the complexity of self-harm, misconceptions and stereotyping make it even more difficult for people to understand Young people suffering from depression and anxiety are more likely to self-harm, but self-harm can occur to anyone of any age. Self-harm, or self-injury, involves intentionally hurting one’s body; activities such as cutting and burning are considered self-harm. It is the result of emotional pain, trauma, anger, and frustration. People may not take the issue seriously because of its complexity. Before reading further, know that this content can...
Read More
Eating Disorders
21
Feb

Seven Ways To Support A Loved One With An Eating Disorder

Feb 21-27 – National Eating Disorders Awareness Week  Nearly 30 million Americans suffer from an eating disorder, and 95% of those individuals are between the ages 12 and 25. Affecting every gender, race, and ethnic group, eating disorders have the highest risk of death of any mental illness. From February 21-27, we recognize National Eating Disorders Awareness Week. If you have a loved one who suffers from an eating disorder, these are seven ways that you can support them.  Take it seriously. Don’t just shrug it off. So...
Read More
School Counseling
07
Feb

School Counselors Play an Important Role in Our Schools

Feb 7-11 National School Counseling Week  From February 7-11, we recognize National School Counseling Week. Students, teachers, parents, and school administrators can benefit from the services that school counselors provide. Due to a variety of factors, school counselors’ roles are ever-changing. Here is an overview of school counseling and the role counselors play. Promote student advocacy Every counselor’s decisions and actions are based on what the students’ needs are and what will benefit them the most. A key purpose of school counseling is to assist students with their...
Read More
Childrens Mental Health
01
Feb

Children’s Mental Health in the Wake of the Pandemic

Children of all ages are dealing with a pandemic that is closing in on its second year and, undoubtedly, the coronavirus has an adverse effect on children’s mental well-being as well. To help parents and children cope with the pandemic, the American Academy of Pediatrics has published guidelines for caring for children’s emotional needs. Experts report that 1 in 4 children experience some form of depression and 1 in 5 experience anxiety or stress. Pediatricians are also expected to be aware of these guidelines, as they are a...
Read More
new year, new you
17
Jan

New Year, Old You — But On the Way to Mental Wellness

Another year has passed. It’s that time of year when people make New Year’s resolutions. What about adding some mental health resolutions to your list? It doesn’t matter if you set New Years’ resolutions or not, setting these goals should make you feel more mentally prepared and better able to handle whatever lies ahead. Set Boundaries It’s important to establish boundaries for yourself and others. According to Anne Katherine, author of Boundaries: Where you end and I begin, “Boundaries bring order to our lives… Boundaries empower us to...
Read More
organization workplace
11
Jan

Mental Health Benefits of an Organized Workspace

You may not realize it, but the state of your workspace has a profound effect on your stress level. In an untidy workplace, there is a constant and avoidable source of stress. In addition to affecting your mental health, this effect will have a negative impact on your work. It’s a good idea to clean and organize your workspace regularly. In recognition of Clean Off Your Desk Day on January 11, we have listed the five significant mental health benefits you can get from an organized and clean...
Read More
2022 New Years Resolutions
03
Jan

3 Easy New Year’s Resolutions to Increase Happiness

Science-based, actionable resolutions for 2022 Ignore the cliched New Year’s Resolutions such as weight loss and “be nicer.” If you’re looking to lose a few pounds, go for it, however here are ten actionable New Year’s resolutions that focus on creating a happier and more fulfilling life, along with the science behind each one. Writing Letters to Your Loved Ones In today’s fast-paced world of instant messaging, emails, and phone calls, good old-fashioned snail mail has lost its charm. Time and effort are often the best ways to...
Read More
family holiday season
20
Dec

Setting Family Boundaries During the Holidays

How to set those boundaries this holiday season Setting boundaries is a hard enough task as it is. But setting boundaries with family you’ve known for years can be a tough situation to navigate. We want to provide you with tips to guide you through the holiday season without allowing others to overstep boundaries that are comfortable to you.  Define Your Boundaries The first step to asserting your boundaries is to map out exactly what you want your boundaries to be and why they are important to you....
Read More
holiday stress
10
Dec

Dealing with Holiday Stress

The most wonderful time of the year is not always so wonderful! The holiday season can be the best time of the year. Spending time with family, time away from work, and good food is the recipe for a wonderful holiday. Unfortunately, this is not always the case for many of us. The holiday season also tends to bring on extra stressors. Financial stress, extra work load, and not being able to see family can be incredibly challenging. While we can’t take the stress away, we’ve compiled a...
Read More
journaling
02
Dec

Create a Journaling Practice for Improved Mental Health

Journals are where we go to explore our thoughts and feelings, to release and hone our creativity. Journals are often our most reliable therapist, audience and guide. Journaling has many known benefits:  Create focus in your life Develop empathy and self-awareness Release repressed or blocked emotions Make your inner world and your outer world more connected Promote mindfulness and letting go of the past Remind yourself of lessons learned and boost your memory Improve your communication skills Be a lot of fun — and a nice thing to...
Read More
gratitude
22
Nov

Finding Gratitude in the Darkness at Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving – the time of year where we rejoice with family, friends, and loved ones to celebrate our gratitude. But when struggling with mental health, the holidays can often be a time of burden and overwhelm. The thick shroud of fog that mental illness can impose on an individual can make it hard to see anything else, especially gratitude. This holiday season, we offer our tips for navigating this difficult time of year.  Take time to unwind.  It’s been a crazy year. Dealing with work, school, COVID-19, and...
Read More
verterans
09
Nov

Honoring Our Veterans with Healthy Connections

Thousands of veterans and their families struggle each year to have conversations about the veteran’s military experiences. Often, family members are afraid to start the conversation for fear of saying the wrong thing, pushing too hard, or triggering traumatic memories. However, while these conversations require care, they do not have to be forbidden. We wanted to thank veterans and their families by encouraging healthy conversations and connections during Veteran’s Day. Having the opportunity to have a healthy, loving, and non-judgmental conversation with your family helps to remove the...
Read More
stress
02
Nov

Manage Your Stress with These Small Changes

Stress is one of those things that never seems to end. Work projects, deadlines at school, medical issues, the list goes on. Add on top of that navigating a pandemic and it’s no wonder we feel stressed so often.  It’s no secret that chronic stress can lead to health issues, which leads to more stress, which leads to… you see the pattern here. Stress management is critical to improving your quality of life. To recognize Stress Awareness Day on November 3, we’ve has compiled a list of stress...
Read More
ADHD
20
Oct

Overlooked Signs of Undiagnosed ADHD in Adults

ADHD is often easy to detect in children. Adults, however, can display subtler symptoms. As a result, many adults struggle with ADHD and may not realize that they have it. Many of their problems, including staying organized and being on time, can be attributed to ADHD. October is ADHD Awareness Month. Here are ten potential warning signs that could signal adult ADHD: Problems with Organization People with ADHD are susceptible to organization problems in adulthood because responsibilities — bills, jobs, kids — make these problems obvious and more...
Read More
bullying
12
Oct

Guiding Adolescents through Social Cruelty

Adolescents struggling to find a social place can hurt each other when they are insecure. As social cruelty behaviors become the norm, they can become more serious later in life. While this is not an attempt to suggest that all students in middle school will participate in, receive, or even witness bullying from peers, there are five identifiable types of mistreatment that do increase in the early secondary years. These include: teasing to put down  exclusion to keep out bullying to push around rumoring to attack one’s reputation...
Read More
depression month
05
Oct

Research About Mental Health in Adolescents and Young Adults

Recent studies have shown that between 2009 and 2017, there were huge increases in mental health issues such as depression, anxiety, and mood disorders in adolescents and young adults (Twenge et al., 2019). Major depression in those between the ages of 12-25 increased from 8 percent to over 13 percent in that time frame. Mental health issues are on the rise, especially among adolescents and young people in the U.S. October is National Depression and Mental Health Screen Month, which encourages individuals who are struggling with their mental...
Read More
media suicide prevention
21
Sep

Media Coverage and its effect on Suicide

There is nothing more devastating than suicide, but it can also fascinate some people. Each September, we recognize Suicide Awareness Month. Following the suicide of a celebrity or well-known person, there is typically a lot of media coverage, speculation, and gossip. Although it is understandable that suicide can be a topic that captures our attention, research has shown that excessive media coverage of suicide can sometimes lead vulnerable people to have increased thoughts of suicide. This phenomenon is known as suicide contagion.  Suicide contagion extends beyond the death...
Read More
suicide prevention
10
Sep

So, How Do We Talk About Suicide?

Suicide is hard to talk about. The subject is uncomfortable. This is in part due to stigmas, general discomfort, and cultural norms. It is painful to consider suicide or fear that a loved one is considering it – yet many are too afraid to bring up the topic because they don’t want those challenging emotions to surface. As we acknowledge Suicide Awareness month, it is important to understand the importance of our role in preventing suicide.  Because of internal and societal pressures mixed with the taboo nature of...
Read More
addiction disability
01
Sep

Should Addiction be Considered a Disability?

In September, we recognize Addiction awareness month. Similar to being blind or deaf, addiction is often thought of as a disability. The question of if addiction should be considered a disease is still controversial even decades later when it was designated as such. Some experts argue that addiction should instead be classified as a dysfunction or a disorder. A new approach is needed to better understand addiction, with many believing that addiction should be considered a disability that can be provided reasonable accommodations in society.  If we consider...
Read More
20
Aug

Difficult Coworker? It might be the Dunning-Kruger Effect

We all know that one coworker who vastly overestimates their own abilities to impress their boss.  Did you know this phenomenon has a name? The Dunning-Kruger Effect (DKE) is a cognitive bias that causes people to overestimate their ability or knowledge in a certain area. This is usually because of a lack of self-awareness that prevents them from having an accurate assessment of their own knowledge or skills.  DKE was first presented in 1999 by David Dunning and Justin Kruger at Cornell University. The psychologists tested research participants...
Read More
10
Aug

What are the Big 5 Personality Traits?

We each have our own personality traits that are unique to us. These personality differences can be broken down into five major traits. These traits are known as the Big 5. Each trait gives insight into how a person feels, thinks, and behaves. The Big 5 Personality traits are:  Openness to experience – Curiosity/Creative imagination  Conscientiousness – Organized, Responsible, Productive  Extroversion – Sociable, Assertive  Agreeableness – Compassionate, Respectful, Trusting  Neuroticism – Anxiety and Depression tendencies  Each person is thought to have some degree of each of these personality...
Read More
01
Aug

Breaking Mental Health Stigmas in Elite Athletics

Mental and physical health challenges affect everyone, including professional, elite, and Olympic athletes. When four-time champion female tennis player Naomi Osaka withdrew from the Roland-Garros French tennis competition due to depression in June 2021, the world was shocked. Pressure, media attention, and fines charged based on the tournament’s code of conduct caused Osaka to take a step back and prioritize her mental health. By doing so, she showed the world that athletes do not need to succumb to the pressures from the sporting world and can break mental...
Read More
Child Bias
20
Jul

How Do Children Become Biased?

Nearly all parents in the United States want their children to see and treat others equally, no matter their ethnic background or race. Many believe that if they do not point out differences to their children that perhaps they will not notice race, hoping that they will treat all differences the same as characteristics like eye color or hair that vary across all races and have little meaning in everyday society. The issue is that this doesn’t seem to work. New research has recently examined how children acquire...
Read More
dermatillomania
12
Jul

What are Body-Focused Repetitive Behaviors?

While not commonly known as body-focused repetitive behaviors or BFRBs, you likely have known or may even be or have been a person experiencing this set of disorders. BFRBs are when self-grooming routines go haywire and may include pulling, picking, biting, or scraping one’s nails, skin, or hair. Some disorders categorized as BFRBs include onychophagia (compulsive nail biting), dermatillomania (compulsive skin picking), or trichotillomania (compulsive hair-pulling). At least 3 percent of the population is thought to have BFRBs. BFRBs have challenged psychologists for decades and are theorized to...
Read More
therapy questions
02
Jul

Frequent Asked Questions About Starting Therapy

Your Most Frequently Asked Questions About Starting Therapy – Answered The signs that a person might benefit from therapy are not always apparent. Even people with no diagnosed mental health conditions or those with a strong support system may benefit from therapy at some point in their life. However, a person may not know when they may need to consider therapy. If you have experienced prolonged periods of anxiety, sadness, or anger, are struggling with a painful life event such as the death of a loved one or...
Read More
children's well being
21
Jun

The Value of Free Play for Children’s Mental Wellbeing

Over the last decade, research has shown that unstructured free play has been rapidly declining despite the acknowledged benefits. The COVID-19 pandemic has encouraged teachers and parents to see the benefits of unstructured play when schools were closed or virtual. Instead, there is often an emphasis on resume-building and more structured play. Extracurricular activities such as clubs, sports, language lessons, or music have replaced unstructured play. Yet the research tells us that open-ended, unstructured play allows children to be more engaged, attentive, and use more complex language skills....
Read More
PTSD relationships
09
Jun

When PTSD Affects Your Relationship

For many with PTSD, life is exhausting and they are unable to enjoy things that used to bring happiness to their lives. PTSD is not something that can be turned on and off and affects most aspects of the sufferer’s life. In June we recognize PTSD awareness month. Even resilient people can suffer from PTSD, which is usually caused from witnessing or experiencing a traumatic event. The experiences of PTSD vary, but people with PTSD often adversely affect relationships with others. By better understanding the triggers of PTSD,...
Read More
PTSD Month
02
Jun

Dispelling 5 Common Myths About PTSD

In June, we recognize PTSD Awareness month. PTSD stands for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and mental health condition that is triggered by a terrifying event that is either experienced or witnessed. Symptoms of PTSD may include nightmares, severe anxiety, flashbacks, avoidance of situations, intrusive thoughts, depression, and more. There are many stigmas surrounding PTSD and there has never been a better time to become more aware of the disorder. The healthcare pandemic, economic crisis, and social justice issues have caused many to have heightened levels of stress and anxiety....
Read More
mental-health-day
20
May

The Importance of Taking Mental Health Days

Each May, we recognize Mental Health Awareness month. An easy way to stay functional and recognize your own mental health is to take a Mental Health Day. If you’re on your third coffee by 10 am and feel like you’ve been through the ringer on a Tuesday, you might need a mental health day. While you’re not physically sick, taking mental health days are important for tackling burnout. Whether you have a mental health condition or not, mental health days are valuable for helping us take much needed...
Read More
Cognitive Behavioral Therapy
10
May

A Brief History of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

In May, we recognize Mental Health Month and are looking deeper into one of the forms of therapy we use in our practice. A common form of therapy today is called cognitive-behavioral therapy. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is a relatively new treatment, with modern techniques that were not available until just a few short decades ago. The early versions of cognitive-behavioral therapy were developed in the 1950s and ‘60s, with improvements made to the treatment protocol continuing until today. The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, the leading professional...
Read More
Postnatal Depression
03
May

Overcoming Pre and Postnatal Depression During a Pandemic

May is National Maternal Depression Awareness Month; Women’s Health Month The last year has been challenging because of the pandemic, but even more so for pregnant women and their loved ones. May is National Maternal Depression Awareness and Women’s Health Month. Trying to stay emotionally healthy is important during pregnancy and the postpartum period, but even more so as we navigate through the COVID-19 pandemic. Nearly a fifth of women struggle with anxiety and depression and will continue to experience symptoms throughout their lives. During pregnancy, women are...
Read More
perimenopausal-woman-depression
22
Apr

Living the Rollercoaster of Perimenopausal Mood Swings

Perimenopause is the years leading up to full menopause, lasting around four years for most women. However, some women may experience symptoms for nearly 10 years. Perimenopause typically begins in a woman’s early 40s, though it may begin earlier for others. Menopause is only officially diagnosed when a woman has not had a menstrual period for over 12 months. Studies have shown that nearly 23% of women will experience mood swings during menopause. Women may also suffer mood swings during perimenopause, often causing many to experience depression or...
Read More
12
Apr

How Parents Can Encourage Leaving the Nest

If you’re an adult with older children who are ready to start their careers, you might be anxiously awaiting the day your child decides to finally move out. But what if they don’t seem to be in a hurry? Or what if you are letting them live at home after a pandemic layoff, but they are spending more time binging Netflix than updating their resume. A failure to leave the nest is a problem for many.  There are a variety of reasons why a failure to launch happens...
Read More
02
Apr

Five Great Things About Having Autism Spectrum Disorder

Autism Awareness Month | April 2 – Autism Awareness Day Each April, we recognize Autism Awareness Month and Autism Awareness Day on April 2. While individuals living with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD, previously categorized as Asperger’s syndrome) can face difficulties such as trying to fit in, relationship issues, or increased vulnerability, there are benefits to having ASD as well. While life can be more challenging with ASD, it can also be wonderful – and we choose to recognize that! Here are five amazing things about being on the...
Read More
World Bipolar Day
29
Mar

Bipolar Disorder & Borderline Personality Disorder: What are the Differences?

March 30 – World Bipolar Day Diagnosing mental illnesses can be challenging as there is usually no way to physically measure or run lab tests that can help determine one diagnosis from another. Helping an individual find the best treatment options for their unique condition also poses a challenge. Mental health professionals depend on symptoms and the pattern these symptoms show over time to make their diagnosis. On March 30th, we recognize World Bipolar Day. Bipolar disorder is commonly confused or even misdiagnosed as Borderline Personality Disorder. Let’s...
Read More

Subscribe to Blog via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 861 other subscribers

    Check Box if You're Human